Calm

calm  (käm)

adj. calm·er, calm·est
1. Nearly or completely motionless; undisturbed: the calm surface of the lake.
2. Not excited or agitated; composed: The President was calm throughout the global crisis.

n. calm
1. An absence or cessation of motion; stillness.
2. Serenity; tranquillity; peace.
3. A condition of no wind or a wind with a speed of less than 1 knot (1.15 miles per hour; 1.9 kilometers per hour), according to the Beaufort scale.

tr. & intr.v. calmed, calm·ing, calms
To make or become calm or quiet: A warm bath will calm you. After the storm, the air calmed.
~The Free Dictionary

When I ask my clients what they are wanting for themselves that’s important to them or what they’re wanting to feel, often I hear the word CALM. “I want to feel calm,” I hear. “I want to feel calm and peaceful inside,” I hear.

Well I do, too. Today I created a visual depiction of what calm feels like to me by doing a little mixed media self-portrait in my art journal.

Calm
Try This:
Create your own visual representation of what calm looks like to you. Perhaps you decorate a photograph of yourself or you fingerpaint soothing colors or create a collage of calming words and images or create some kind of sculpture or fabric piece.  Notice how you feel as you create. Do you feel any calmer by the creative process? Where do you feel the calm in your body? Allow your creative process to be quick, yet not hurried, like a gentle river flowing downstream. Don’t look back, keep moving forward, don’t criticize your work, keep going.

** Just like my “Face Your Intentions” art challenge, I invite you to create your version of calm and email a .jpeg file to me (at cputnam@rising-bird.com) by tomorrow (Tuesday, 1/29) evening at 10pm.  I would LOVE to put our calm pieces all together and hold a cyber-vigil for inner peace and calm. **

 

Advertisements

About Courtney Putnam

I first came to healing work through art and writing. Creating collage art and poetry in particular allowed me to deeply understand the benefit of self-expression in the healing process. But, I also began to see the benefit of bodywork (manual work in the form of massage and energywork in the form of Reiki) as keys to unlocking the emotional stresses we hold in our bodies. I became a Reiki practitioner in 2002, received an MFA in Creative Writing in 2003, received my massage license in the spring of 2006, and became a Reiki Master in 2010. In my practice I bring together these three areas -- the body, the mind, and the spirit (or energy body) -- so others may experience profound and positive change in their lives.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s